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Job creation is wild card in Internet gambling

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Casino dealers may work in warehouses, deal live to online players

 

It’s 5:45 a.m. — almost time to start the day’s shift as a casino dealer.

 

Even in a town that never sleeps, this time of day isn’t busy on the Strip. But the evening is just getting started on the Pacific Rim. And that’s the time that really matters at your casino; that’s when the daily crush begins.

 

As you drive up, your casino doesn’t look anything like the palaces lining the Strip. Your workplace is a nondescript building in the suburbs — a warehouse, to the untrained eye.

 

Walk in, take your place behind a blackjack table. Behind you is a blue screen. In front of you, where you once remembered players sitting, are several cameras.

 

Below each are signal lights, telling you whether a player  Pengeluaran HK connected to your table via the Internet wants to hit, stand, split or double down. Another camera hovers above you. This warehouse is filled with dozens of dealers, all in similar sound-stage-type setups designed for this latest evolution of Internet gambling.

 

You know this isn’t a casino on the Las Vegas Strip. Yet thousands of miles away in Tokyo, Hong Kong or Seoul, South Korea, your customers don’t know that. To those players, the blue screen is transformed into what appears to be the interior of a Strip casino. And you’re apparently right in the middle of it.

 

A computer screen in front of the table begins scrolling text, and you begin friendly chatter with your players. It took some time to get used to having a conversation with a computer monitor, but you got used to it. Eventually.

 

It can get lonely at times. But then again, you don’t have players blowing smoke in your face, you don’t have to pause to clean a spilled drink off the table. There’s no way a player 10,000 miles away can get in your face after a string of bad luck. And on busy nights — when there are 500 players stacked around each baccarat and roulette table — the tokes can be substantial. Very substantial.

 

And as you shuffle and deal, a thought flits through your mind that’s been there dozens of times before. Who, in their right mind, could ever have imagined this 10 years ago?

 

A new reality

 

There were two key reasons casino-style gambling spread from its nest in Nevada across the country in the 1990s: taxes and jobs.

 

Casinos are job-creation machines, and nowhere is the evidence of this clearer than in Nevada. One out of every four workers relies directly on the gaming industry for a paycheck. Eleven of the state’s 15 largest employers are Strip casinos.

 

If legal Internet gambling becomes a reality in this country, what will happen to these Las Vegas jobs?

 

Nothing, the experts say. The simple reason is that the experience of the Las Vegas Strip cannot be replicated on the Internet.

 

“These (Strip casinos) are entertainment centers with gambling at the core,” said Bill Eadington, director of the Institute for the Study of Gambling and Commercial Gaming at UNR. “There has always been a great fear that new technologies are going to wipe out existing industries. I seriously doubt that’s going to happen to the casino industry … Las Vegas in particular.”

 

What is disputed is whether Internet casinos will create the kinds of jobs traditional casinos have. A lack of new jobs could make the pill of Internet gaming harder to swallow across the United States, American Gaming Association Chief Executive Frank Fahrenkopf said.

 

“I don’t see it as an engine of job creation,” Fahrenkopf said. “I don’t see that many jobs resulting from Internet gambling. And in (gambling) jurisdictions, particularly new jurisdictions, the job creation and economic development … has been critical for the acceptance of it (legalized gambling).”

 

But suppose you could take part of the Las Vegas experience — the interaction with a real dealer at a real table game — and bring it to the Internet? That would offer the player a more realistic casino experience, and it gives gaming regulators a physical game to watch and regulate.

 

“The idea fascinates me, and I’d say I’d be very likely to play under those conditions,” said Richard Munchkin, a writer from Santa Clarita, Calif., and frequent Internet gambler. “I play (on the Internet) quite a bit, anything from blackjack to roulette to slot machines. Supposedly everything is honest. But if you’re watching a game that’s taking place in a casino live in Las Vegas, I’d feel much more comfortable that the game is 100 percent honest.

 

“It’s not the same as playing in Las Vegas, but if you can’t be there, it sounds like the next best thing.”

 

It isn’t science fiction. The idea of bringing a live game to a remote player is 20 years old. And a Caribbean Internet casino, owned by Macau gambling tycoon Stanley Ho, is now offering games with live dealers to gamblers through the Internet. DrHo.com claims it had 23 million “hits” in its first six months of operation.

 

Companies are ready

 

If Nevada decides to legalize Internet gaming, a number of companies are ready to move in that direction as well.

 

One is a name all of Las Vegas is familiar with: Station Casinos Inc. Tony Fontaine, Station’s vice president of complex business solutions, envisions a day when the company could operate warehouse-style filming complexes, broadcasting live dealers to the world.

 

“Everyone’s spending a lot of money trying to recreate a virtual rendition of their casino,” Fontaine said. “What I’m doing is saying, ‘Here’s the real casino.’ The only difference is you don’t have to have it in a nice place. You can put it in a warehouse, dress it up inside, but it can be located off the Strip.”

 

If Nevada takes that step, proponents of live Internet gambling say more jobs than ever before will be created by this new technology. And those jobs could be far different than anything a Las Vegas dealer knows today. Consider, for example, Playboy Enterprises’ for-fun casino, which combines video poker with strip poker.

 

“If you’re Playboy, you could have a (Playboy) Bunny as a dealer (on a live Internet casino),” Fontaine said.

 

But there will also be room for today’s dealers, asserts deedee Molnick, chief executive of i2 Corp. of Las Vegas.

 

“They would become stars,” Molnick said. “They’re not going to be peons behind a table. They’re going to be stars.”

 

Coming up with a concept and patenting it is one thing. Making the idea a viable business is another.

 

While DrHo.com is operating its own live Internet casino, the U.S. companies exploring the idea don’t plan to take that route.

 

i2, for example, has built its financial house on a single asset: the strength of its patent. The company, majority-owned by the Molnick family, claims patent protection over any form of remote, live wagering that uses electronic transactions to make or pay off bets. Revenues would be generated by licensing that patent to other companies in exchange for a cut of gambling profits, along with providing consulting services.

 

Since Internet gambling is already a thriving business, i2 could be generating revenues today, President Chris Almida said. But the company hasn’t done so because it doesn’t want to jeopardize its standing before the Nevada Gaming Control Board if Internet gaming does become legal.

 

So for now, most of i2’s efforts have been focused on educating gaming companies and regulators about Internet gambling — and suing those companies that bring live Internet gambling to market without paying royalties.

 

These legal efforts have been quite successful. In February 2000, i2 won a federal court order forcing First Live Casino, a Caribbean Internet gambling site, to stop offering live games on its website. An order against Interactive Television Services Inc. of Roswell, Ga., followed.

 

“I’m the only person in the world that’s been able to shut down an Internet casino,” Molnick said.

 

Now, i2 has the powerful Stanley Ho in its sights. In July, i2 filed suit against DrHo.com, claiming it was infringing the i2 patent. DrHo.com officials have denied their site violates the patent.

 

But i2’s efforts have caught the attention of other companies, including Station Casinos.

 

Station’s Internet efforts are being focused through GameCast Live LLC, a newly formed subsidiary. For now, GameCast is focused on a non-Internet application: offering guests in a casino hotel the ability to play a live slot machine from a remote location, such as their hotel room. That would allow Station to generate revenues from the venture before a decision is made on Internet gambling’s legality in Nevada and the United States.

 

Fontaine hopes to offer the service in Station’s properties one day, but Nevada gaming regulations don’t allow that at the moment. Station has proposed regulation changes to the Nevada Gaming Commission, but doesn’t expect they will to come to fruition until next year. So Station has launched its marketing efforts with Indian casinos and cruise lines.

 

But Fontaine is thinking ahead. He sees a day when GameCast could be used to offer live table games across the world, starting with blackjack.

 

And he’s well aware of the i2 patent.

 

“It doesn’t cover live gaming, it covers financial transactions related to live gaming,” Fontaine said. “If you’re tied into a third-party financial system, like a credit card … that’s what the patent covers. We leave that end alone, because we don’t want to infringe on the patent. If we sell to someone who wants to get into credit cards … they call (i2), and cut a deal with them. That’s the stand we’ve taken.”

 

Station is looking at two business models. The first is offering to install the system for a casino operator, but letting the operator provide the dealers and run the games. Station could also run the entire casino using the brands of the client.

 

But Fontaine said it’s unlikely Station would try to become an Internet gambling power itself.

 

“Station Casinos doesn’t have the media power to create that draw,” Fontaine said. “We’d prefer to license to a Park Place (Entertainment Corp.), or an MGM MIRAGE, or a Mandalay Resort Group.”

 

Continuing evolution

 

And allowing those companies to recreate the Las Vegas experience in cyberspace might actually help the continuing evolution of the Las Vegas Strip, UNLV professor and gambling expert Bill Thompson argues.

 

“If it’s legal, then we can participate, then we can promote our casinos through it, then we can keep the profits from the gambling, then the profits can go into the expansion of Vegas,” Thompson said. “Our best defense is to make them (Internet casinos) legal and operate them.”

 

But even those who patronize online casinos say there’s no comparison between Las Vegas and the Internet.

 

“It’s no replacement at all,” Munchkin said. “There’s so much more to Las Vegas than just the gambling. There’s the whole excitement of being in a casino in Las Vegas, the energy. I enjoy being around other people when I gamble, being around other players.

 

“I think it (Internet gambling) is like fast food compared to a banquet (gambling on the Strip).”

 

And as long as Las Vegas casino companies believe they can still make a buck on the Strip, they’ll build more megaresorts, no matter what the future may bring.

 

“If there’s a market to build a billion-dollar place, people will do it,” MGM MIRAGE spokesman Alan Feldman said. “No one has ever done it (built a Strip megaresort) thinking they won’t make money.”

 

 …

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THE ACTUAL sbobet TOURNAMENT

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I HAVEN’T EVEN GOTTEN TO THE PARTY YET SO JUST BEAR WITH ME

Let’s just skip to the final table shall we. It’s the main event, the part we all came to see. Actually very few of us came here to play poker, but this is the best of it and it certainly deserves a telling.

10 players remained and 5 were sbobet Palmetto proud (This is a South Carolina expression meaning they’re homeboys). In fact, 40% of the final table was comprised of members of the Smith family. I’ve tried all afternoon to think of any event where a single family has shown so much dominance and the closest I can come up with is the Corleones.

The entire table looked like this :

Double As

Dr. Pauly

Wes Nile Virus

Shep Tiltstein

Team Scott Smith

Debbie Smith

The Wolverine (also a Smith)

Lefty

Daddy

Uncle Brian (who knocked me out)

Honorary Feature Table bubble and 11th place finisher = Al Can’t Hang

At the start DoubleAs held a massive chip advantage and Daddy was close behind. The Wolverine cut into both stacks with some very crafty plays. Then shortly after Uncle Brian (Stupid pocket Kings) busted out we had the hand of the century….******* For Much Greater Detail on this hand you must read the END of this post a future post [ed’s correction], but here’s the short version:

Only two players, Daddy and The Wolverine see the flop :

It’s A-7-7.

The turn is a rag.

The river is a 7.

Daddy bets the river and The Wolverine pushes all in. Daddy says, “You have quads don’t you?” Then he lays down, FOLDS, pocket aces.

The Wolverine shows the hammer, Quad 7s.

AN APOLOGY

Meanwhile, the party was rockin’ outside. Four pretty girls dressed, oddly, as Hooter’s girls arrived. They brought dozens of their closest friends. My buddy Ted and his parents arrived and his mother who has very nice Hooters herself begged me to touch the muscles of her thigh. She’d been working out and, while I was uncomfortable, I hate to be rude.

Eva’d made me another LIT and a coupla carbombs too. I’d started tinkering with SoCo and had a head full of beer. After the previous night, it was easy to get the stupid flowing. Dr. Jeff calls it the “shampoo effect”.

THE SHAMPOO EFFECT

You know how when you lather your hair and then rinse, you get a pretty mild lather of bubbles on the hair.

But…

If you follow the directions and actually REPEAT the process you almost instantly get a full head of giant bubbles. The previous wash made the second one quicker.

Likewise, if you still feel last night’s booze, today’s is coming FAST.

Friends my buzz was moving like my Head and Shoulders and Al Can’t Hang is a lousy conditioner. Therefore, I’m a bit sketchy on the EXACT tournament details but I can tell what I remember. Most of my memories begin at the DRUNK OLYMPICS…

SANS CHEESE BALLS

WHAT I REMEMBER

Pauly beat Wes (The Big Pirate). They chopped the pot and then had one had to determine a champion. It was Pauly.

Within moments the gospel spread and the great game was over. Millions of devout Pauly fans shed tears of joy, millions of pirates returned to their jobs at Capital One. Better still, the DRUNK OLYMPICS were ready to begin.

Otis, Al and I dragged a PA system with two speakers to the upper corner of the driveway, Otis plugged it in, and said, “Hello” to the crowd. They were all there by then, and even the Hooters girls perked up.

CJ and BG were the referees.…

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The 2011 Comeback Kids

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Down on your poker luck, who doesn’t think of the famous Jack Straus maxim “a chip and a chair”? Twenty-nine years ago, in the 1982 World Series of bandar judi pulsa tournament, Jack Strauss was reduced to nothing but a $500 chip and his chair. Days later, creating the legend of one of the most amazing comebacks in the history of poker, Jack Strauss won the tournament, and a $500,000 purse.

“A chip and a chair” is all you need to make your comeback. And in 2011, there are already some serious underdogs writing their own comeback stories …

Chris Moneymaker

The one-time-lucky, seven-year-bust, comeback-accountant

Who doesn’t know the story of Chris Moneymaker? He is likely the single greatest reason for poker’s popularity boom in the last 8 years. As a total unknown in 2003, and working as an accountant in Tennessee, Moneymaker bought into a $39 satellite tournament on PokerStars. He ended up winning a seat a the World Series of Poker Main Event, the most revered and coveted tournament in the world, and became a legend.

Moneymaker bested a field of 838 players. In the final heads-up match, he faced Sammy Farha, a well-known and highly successful poker celebrity. Moneymaker took first place, and the enormous $2.5 million grand prize. He quit his job to become a professional poker player, and went on to live the dream!

But, Moneymaker was a total bust.

From 2005 through most of 2008, Moneymaker didn’t record just about any live tournament cash worth talking about. In 2008, he recorded two cashes for just over $150k. In 2009, he recorded one cash for $15k. Considering living expenses, and regular poker losses, these types of cashes after 4 years of running dry were nothing but blips on the radar. (2010? No real cashes.) People have looked at Moneymaker as an amateur who got lucky once, and just didn’t have what it takes to be a regular winner. Generating mostly losses for seven years (not like he couldn’t afford to) does not earn you respect.

Enter 2011… Moneymaker hired a mental coach. He began leaning on his experience of 8 years of regular play. He developed strategies, and studies regularly. Moneymaker has decided to stop being a lucky player, and start being a smart one. The result? 2011 is only three months in, and he won second place in the National Heads up Championship (to the tune of a cool $300,000) and 11th place in the PokerStars Caribbean Adventure Main Event (for a respectable $130,000). In these three short months, he has pulled in more significant tournament money than in the entire seven years prior.

His rate of winning far exceeds anything he has ever accomplished to date, and his consistent performances suggest a totally new style of play. With determination, and the willingness to invest in developing his skill, Moneymaker has taken a whole new tack and completely upended all the negative opinions. Moneymaker is on the comeback trail, and just might be earning the respect of poker professionals by the end of 2011.

Patrik Antonius

The Finnish Rollercoaster

2009 was the year of Patrik Antonius. Up $9 million, almost all of it in online winnings, the Finnish pro put up a stellar performance. But later that year, he admitted in an interview that he “lost millions, millions, millions of dollars with other stuff last year.”

2010 didn’t get any better. He lost $3.6 million in the year from high stakes cash games alone, going nowhere about as fast as you can go. In addition to his poker losses, Antonius reportedly lost millions in sports bets, and millions on the golf course. To cap it all off, Antonius began suffering seriously from his back problems, and was forced to attend rehabilitation sessions twice a day. Antonius summed it all up pretty simply: “I hate these moments when everything just goes bad.”

That’s what they call a tailspin.

Enter 2010… Antonius plays Draw Poker. A lot of Draw Poker. It’s March, and he’s won more almost $2 million at this game alone. With his other online poker efforts, he pulled in by the end of February a huge $3 million in profit. That’s more than Moneymaker made in one of the world’s largest tournaments in 2003!

Let’s put this in perspective: last year in March, Antonius was negative $3 million. That is a $6 million difference year-to-date. That is more money than most people will earn in two lifetimes! Antonius credits his intense focus and work ethic for his ability to create such a turnaround. But come on Patrik, what poker secret do you know that we don’t? Regardless, we’ve only got respect for a player who can comeback like this.

Just remember poker players: no matter how bad it gets (losing $3 million in three months is pretty bad!), there is always another comeback story waiting to be written. All you need is a chip and a chair……

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Danger, Otis slot hoki Robinson!

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It shoves a poorly-manicured thumbnail in your navel and twists. It drags you by your nose into dark corners where ne’er-do-wells skulk and rodents feed on trash. Perhaps more dangerous, it hangs you from a mountain summit and says, “So, you wanna play, huh? Well, then let’s play.”

Limit Hold’em has been boring me recently. I usually play slot hoki limit on Empire. The variance has been a little high recently. That was of little concern to me. Variance is variance. I was getting a little tired, though, of playing perfect poker and losing. And, of course, even the most disciplined among us tend to tilt a little when the bad run runs too long. When that happens, I’ll be the first to admit, I’m not playing perfect poker.

I was on the verge of something we all do from time to time. I was about to take a break. I was going to try to wrap my head around the game without playing it. Bobby Baldwin’s chapter in Super System was about to get some serious work. I like to call myself a a limit player who dabbles in no-limit tourneys. If I was going to talk like that, I needed to back it up.

In the spirit of Al Can’t Hang, Pauly, and Iggy, perhaps a drinking analogy is appropriate here.

I see Limit Hold’em as a beer drinker’s game. It’s a steady game, well-paced, with little room for disaster unless you choose otherwise. Sure, it’s possible to have a few too many and wake up wicked hungover. But there’s little doubt, you made the choice to do that, and the hangover usually isn’t that bad.

No-limit, as we all know, is for people who like to ride the lightning. It’s a shot-drinker’s game. If you choose to have one drink and wait for the nuts, you’re going to be okay. But if you’re really committed to playing the game, you’ve got to be willing to be hungover for three days. You’ve got to be willing to go broke.

As a semi-professional drinker, I know both games pretty well. I’ve suffered the victories. I’ve suffered the hangovers. I’ve made some decent money and I’ve almost gone broke a couple of times.

Simply put, those are the devils I know. And, frankly, I’ve been a little bored.

A bored poker player can be as dangerous as a bored drinker. When one gets bored, he starts to experiment. That brings us to Otis’ latest experiment in chasing the high.

Two-hundred dollar buy-in Pot Limit.

After a recent final table finish in Empire’s $25,000 guarantee Sunday night tourney, my bankroll was such that I could afford to lose $200. On a bored evening, I recently sat down at the $200 PL and decided to play.

I won $350 in a 45 minute session.

I stood up, and rightly, went out for a drink or ten. I ruminated over the possibilities for most of the evening. It seemed way too easy. I had hit and run the table for a sizable chunk of cash. There was a part of me that thought I had just found a poker utopia. Like anyone who buys a lottery ticket, I had visions of grandeur. The 45 minute session had just crowned me king of the poker world.

Of course, when I was thinking, I was drinking. I was no king. I was a guy sitting at a bar and trying to negotiate with the bartender. The Bait Shack had recently increased its draft price by 50%. I argued that since I had been drinking there since they opened, I should be grandfathered. I should get every third beer free. They didn’t see things my way.

The next day, I sat back down and lost every bit if my winnings in two hands. Most of it left my stack when a guy called $150 against my king-high spade flush with AJo. He held the ace of spades and the fourth spade came on the river.

I considered myself no worse for the wear. It was an experiment in riding the lightning. I survived and vowed to return to $3/$6 limit as soon as I stopped cursing.

Had it not been for Pauly asking me to write a little something for his blog-zine, I might never have ventured back into the world of $200 PL. But since he asked, and I was writing, I thought I’d sit and play a little more. I entered a $20+$2 multi and sat at a $200 PL table.

It became a four-hour session. I wrote the piece (hopefully to be featured in an upcoming edition of Truckin’) and played steady poker.

When I stood up, I had placed 9th in the tourney. What’s more, my $200 buy-in had turned into $733.

So, here I sit, 12 hours after a very nice winning session. It was not a hit and run. It was steady poker, played well. I remember laying down top two pair to a $90 bet when there was a possible straight on the board and two to a flush as well. I had my head wrapped around the game and didn’t feel like I was riding the lightning. I felt confident and sober.

Still, as the title of this post suggests, I know I’m walking a fine line. While my bankroll could stand a slight correction, I don’t know that I’m qualified or wealthy enough to play at that level.

Here I sit, sober and staring at an open bar. I ask myself, what would the great experimenter Pauly do? What would pro-drinkerAl Can’t Hang do? What would tee-totalling poker pro Felicia do?

More interesting, however…what is Otis going to do?…

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Insider Secrets To Building A Sales Funnel

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Have you finally got your small business off the ground, at least to the point where you’re starting to see a modest profit, but you’re still struggling to generate solid new sales leads to help build a reliable customer base? If this sounds like you then look no further than the “funneling money into your pockets.” Sales funnel creation course. This unique and interesting academic course will teach you everything you need to know about creating a successful and reliable sales funnel so that your business can constantly generate new sales leads and keep traffic funneling to your website or store. This course will teach you how to use a sales funnel for everything from affiliate marketing campaigns and email marketing campaigns and even how to use a sales file off-line and much more. By the time you have completed this course you will have all the information and skills necessary to create a sales funnel that will allow you to take your business to the next level.

What you will learn:

1) You will learn the definition of a sales funnel and how they are used to generate customer leads.

2) You will learn how to use an automated sales funnel to help your business grow.

3) You will learn how to use and build a sales from foreign email marketing campaign.

4) You will learn how to create and use funded proposals for your sales funnel.

5) You will learn how to build a successful off-line sales funnel.

6) You will learn how to conduct proper market research so as much of your market demographic gets sucked into your funnel as possible.

7) You will learn how to construct a sales funnel from scratch.

8) You will learn how to capture emails and other necessary information for your customer database and so much more.

Who this class is for: this class is expressly designed to help those individuals running a small business, whether they are housewives students or entrepreneurs that are looking to understand how to generate more sales leads as well as traffic to their website or store for the purposes of building and maintaining a healthy customer base so that they can generate as much profit within their given market niche as possible. While it is not expressly necessary for a student to have an extensive background in business before registering for this course. A basic understanding of small business organization would be considered advantageous.

This class is NOT designed to teach students or readers how to start a business. This is not a turnkey business course. This course is expressly designed to teach students and readers how to set up, use and maintain various types of sales funnels for their business so that they can attract a reliable customer base. This course in no way teaches students how to start a small business. If this is what you’re looking for. It is suggested that you take some business 101 or other entrepreneurial courses before registering for this class. To translate this content in other language, contact Translation Companies UK

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